January 2016 Dividend Income – $111.51

Dividend Income We Earned for January 2016

We may earn money or products from the companies mentioned in this post.

It is hard to believe that one month is already in the books for 2016! January got off to a really good start for our dividend income results. There were no new records set but we did hit triple digits, which is a first for the month of January.

Here is our dividend income portfolio results for January, 2016 –

2016 January Dividend Income Results

How We Earned $111.51 in Dividends in January 2016

January 2016 Dividend Income

While it wasn’t our highest recorded dividend income month ever, we had our best January result! This past January proved that our portfolio is continuing to grow at a nice pace.

This is just another little reminder that the new money we are investing is working for our family. Of course, we are also continuing to reinvest our dividends into new stock and are enjoying annual dividend increases from the companies we own.

Just look at the growth we have seen over the past 4 years based on January dividend numbers –

January 2016 Dividend Income – $102.03

Updated January 2016 Dividend Income – $111.51

January Dividends
Note – I forgot to include our dividend income from SYY during January, so our totals have been updated.

We saw an increase of over 30% last month compared to January 2015! This gives us the needed motivation to keep at it for many years to come.

Here is the breakdown of dividend income (by stock) in January, along with the number of new shares added from DRiP –

  • Cincinnati Financial Corp (CINF) – $34.31 (.62 shares DRiP)
  • Dr Pepper Snapple Group, Inc. (DPS) – $.17 ($.17 cash)
  • The Kraft Heinz Company (KHC) – $.26 ($.26 cash)
  • Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMT) – $46.32 (.20 shares DRiP)
  • Realty Income Corporation (O) – $6.69 ($6.69 cash)
  • Sysco Corporation (SYY) – $9.48 (.24 shares DRiP)
  • Wal-Mart Stores Inc (WMT) – $14.28 ($14.28 cash)
Dividend Income by Stock in January

Dividend Income by Stock – January 2016

Note – All of the dividends we currently receive are reinvested into new shares of the same stock using DRiP – except those purchased through our LOYAL3 and Robinhood accounts.

New Capital Invested in January

Regardless of which direction the market is going, we have been dedicated to investing new money into dividend stocks. Here are the new investments we made in January –

  • $118.30 lump sum investment in Aflac Incorporated (AFL) – 2 shares
  • $150 automatic investment in Microsoft (MSFT) – 2.85 shares
  • $50 automatic investment in Unilever (UL) – 1.24 shares
  • $50 automatic investment in Verizon (VZ) – .94 shares
  • $150 automatic investment in WalMart (WMT) – 2.33 shares

We had our normal automatic investments in WalMart, Verizon, Unilever, and Microsoft through LOYAL3 and Computershare. In addition, we added 2 shares of Aflac (AFL).

Overall, our new investments were a lot lower than what I had hoped for. Unfortunately, we ended up running up some bills over the holidays that we are working to pay off which limited new investments.

The total amount of new capital invested in January was – $518.30

Here are the new investment totals for the year (only January at this point) –

  • January Investments – $518.30

New 2016 Investments – $518.30

12 Month Forward Dividend Income

We continue to track our 12 month forward dividend income each month. Several factors will determine if our forward dividends increase including: adding new shares, dividend reinvestment’s, and when a company raises its annual dividend.

Here are our current and past results for the past 6 months –

12 Month Forward Dividend Income

  • August 2015 – $1,615.53
  • September 2015 – $1,679.28
  • October 2015 – $1,698.24
  • November 2015 – $1,787.93
  • December 2015 – $1,797.68
  • January 2016 – $1,802.06

We are very pleased with where our future dividend income projections are at. There was a bit of a slowdown as you can see the last couple of months. Part of this was due to dividend cuts made by ConocoPhillips (COP). But the good news is despite losing a bunch of future dividend income, the other stocks in our portfolio made up for the loss!

Conclusion

The dividend income earned in January ($111.51) was up over 30% from the same time last year. This is all a direct result of pumping more and more money into the stock market.

This puts us in a good position to start the new year out as January is typically a slow month for dividend income. Our goal is to earn $2,250 in dividend income in 2016.

How was your dividend income in January? Are you selling any of your oil stocks that have recently slashed dividends?

Full Disclosure – At the time of this writing, we owned shares in the following stocks noted in this post – AFL, CINF, COP, DPS, KHC, LMT, MSFT, O, UL, VZ, and WMT. The material above is not a recommendation to buy. Please do your own research on a company before deciding to invest.

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Click Here to Leave a Comment Below 3 comments
Drake - March 23, 2016

I use Robinhood and Loyal3. So out of curiosity can you give me an example of which stocks you have allocated where. Because Robinhood does not allow for dividend reinvestments as you know and Loyal3 has some good stocks that are worth DRIPing(Microsoft, Apple) to name a few. I looked at your Moneysprout index, which is a nice diversified portfolio. But I’m at a crossroads as to whether I should own Microsoft in my Robinhood account or DRIP it in a Loyal3 account.
P.S I know you don’t give investment advice, but I’m looking for a second opinion and you decided which firm was best for the stocks you own.

Reply
    Drake - March 23, 2016

    So my question would be if both Robinhood and Loyal3 carry a new stock you want to invest in how do you choose which platform to use? and why?

    Reply
      John - March 23, 2016

      @Drake – Ultimately, I would choose LOYAL3 over Robinhood for the simple fact they let you buy partial shares. I like to spread my monthly investments out across several different stocks and LOYAL3 allows for more flexibility as you can buy partial shares. Certainly nothing wrong with Robinhood, but if I had to pick between the 2 right now it would be LOYAL3.

      Plus, being able to buy partial shares lets me put my dividend earnings to work faster than through Robinhood.

      Hope this helps!

      Reply

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